Reading horizons: Episode 23

Reading Horizons: October 2019

What I’m reading now

Abir Mukherjee is about to publish the fourth book in his crime series set in 1920s Calcutta. Death In the East comes out on November 14 in the UK. I have a copy to review. But before plunging in this far into the series I thought I should get familiar with the main character and the setting by reading the first in the series: A Rising Man.  

This novel introduces us to Captain Sam Wyndham, formerly a Scotland Yard detective, who arrives in India hoping to make a new start after his experiences in the trenches of World War 1. He has barely got his feet under the table in his new role with the Indian police when he’s called in to solve the murder of a senior British official. 

Abir Mukherjee

So far this is proving an enjoyable read. I love the detail about Calcutta and the tense relationships between the British governing class and the Indian population. I can see why this book won the Crime Writers’ Association Endeavour Dagger for best historical crime novel in 2017 and was the Sunday Times crime novel of the month in May 2017.

By contrast I’m listening to Michelle Obama’s memoir Becoming. I have the print version of this and have dipped into sections of it over the past few months. Hearing her narrate the book gives it extra impact I think.

What I just finished reading

It’s a mystery why I haven’t read more of Penelope Lively’s work. I loved Moon Tiger which won the Booker Prize in 1987 but I’ve never gone on to read anything else by her, despite having three of her books on my shelves.

Reading How It All Began was a chance to put that right. And what a wonderful experience this turned out to be. It’s a cleverly plotted tale of seven people whose lives are derailed because one elderly person is mugged on a warm April day.

Penelope Lively

Via Twitter and comments on my review I’ve now added to the list of other Penelope Lively books I definitely want to read. The Photograph seems to be the one most highly recommended.

What I’ll read next

Now usually this is a tough question because I don’t like to overly plan my reading (I’m realising that challenges which involve making a list are not my thing). But for once I know what I’m going to read next because there are some books that have deadlines attached to them.

First in the queue is The Dutch House by Ann Patchett which I just collected from the library. There’s a very long queue of library members who all want this book so I know there will be no chance of renewing it and I’ll have to finish it before the return date.

Then there’s the new Abir Mukherjee novel I mentioned earlier, Death In the East which I need to read and review by November 18.

Also coming up soon is Love Is Blind which is the book club choice for November. I’m ambivalent about this one. I used to love William Boyd (Brazzaville Beach was my favourite) but in recent years I’ve been less than enthused by his work. Have any of you read Love Is Blind and can tell me whether its so-so or Boyd at his best?

That should keep me busy for a while.


Those are my plans. Now what’s on YOUR reading horizon for the next few weeks?


This post is for WWW Wednesday hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

About BookerTalk

What do you need to know about me? 1. I'm from Wales which is one of the countries in the UK and must never be confused with England. 2. My life has always revolved around the written and spoken word. I worked as a journalist for nine years then in international corporate communications 3. My tastes in books are eclectic. I love realism and hate science fiction and science fantasy. 4. I am trying to broaden my reading horizons geographically by reading more books in translation

Posted on October 23, 2019, in Crime and thrillers, Reading plans and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I am reading The Game of Kings by Dorothy Dunnett. I learned of it from Helen at She Reads Novels. It was rough going at first but with a little help from the internet I am beginning to see why the readers who love it, love it so much.

  2. I’ve had Lively recommended to me multiple times and have never gotten around to her, but I know I will eventually. I’m making my way through The Children of Harvey Milk, a look at LGBT politicians around the world (but mostly in English speaking countries) and the affect of LGBT visibility on legislation. I am definitely going to need a lighter read after this though!

  3. Plans… Not a thing I do much as a rule, except when e.g. one of our reading clubs is coming up! As I’m recovering from 1930, I’m going to keep it loose, but I do have a short ghost story waiting, plus some review books, and possibly something for German Lit month and Margaret Atwood Reading month. Or maybe none of those things…. ;D

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