The Tangled Weave of Messy Lives: Entanglement by John Danenbarger

I know next to nothing about quantum theory beyond the fact that it’s complex, uncertain and relates to connections between different fields of science.

Entanglement by John K Danenbarger

The quantum concept takes on a human dimension in Entanglement – Quantum + Otherwise by John K Danenbarger. He takes a cast of eight deeply flawed characters and shows how their lives are inexplicably entwined; one person’s actions having unexpected consequences both for themselves and others.

It’s an ambitious novel, made more complex by the way the discontinuous structure of the narrative. We jump from one character to another, leap backwards and forwards in time (sometimes skipping a decade) and switch locations. Some characters disappear from the narrative for chapters only to re-appear. Others disappear entirely, the victims of a road accident or a shooting, the significance of which only becomes apparent several chapters later.

It begins with Beth Sturgess, a young drug addict found in a bad shape on a street in Bangor, Maine. Her rescuer is Joe Tink, a stripper in a local bar who has a passion for reading. Thinking he is doing her a favour, Joe gets her a job on a yacht heading for Bermuda. But she ends up in even bigger trouble and has to escape from a man with a track record for keeping sex slaves.

And then suddenly we lost Beth and the narrative is switched to the other main characters including a police officer, a physics professor and a mentally disturbed young man. Some of these people have been keeping secrets all their lives. Two of them commit murder. To say their lives are messy would be an understatement.

Entanglement is the kind of novel where you have to keep your wits about you. I found it utterly confusing to begin with, unable to see how all the scenes and episodes fitted together. Often I wasn’t even sure I knew which character was the focus of the chapter. I suspect the fact I was engaging with this book in audio format made things even more difficult despite the narrator’s skill at using different voices.

But the individual stories were enticing and I was more than a little curious how they would fit together. The more the novel developed, the more engrossing it became. It actually became great fun trying to assemble the pieces of information and find the connections. Admittedly it was a little hard to keep up with the story line at times because of its multiple twists and turns but perseverance was definitely rewarded.

Ultimately Entanglement is a book about mistakes and bad decisions, about the flaws in each of us and the sheer complexity about being human.

People who understand quantum theory would probably understand the metaphor upon which the book is based, far better than I could. But I never felt that my lack of knowledge was a hinderance. What you do need is some patience and a willingness to go with the flow, wherever that takes you.

Entanglement Quantum + Otherwise : End Notes

Entanglement was published by StormBlock Publishing in August 2019. The audio version went on release in October 2019. I received a copy from the publishers via MindbuckMedia in return for an honest review

Atlanta-born author John Danenbarger gained a degree in English and Creative Writing from the University of Kansas.. With a backlist of short stories, Danenbarger established the Salem Massachusetts Writers’ Club. After living in Oslo, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, and Massachusetts , Danenbarger achieved a merchant marine captain’s license, sailing for two years on the New England coast including two round-trips to Bermuda. He now spends much of his time writing in Italy.

The narrator of the audiobook, David de Vries is an award-winning narrator with more than 100 titles to his credit.

About BookerTalk

What do you need to know about me? 1. I'm from Wales which is one of the countries in the UK and must never be confused with England. 2. My life has always revolved around the written and spoken word. I worked as a journalist for nine years then in international corporate communications 3. My tastes in books are eclectic. I love realism and hate science fiction and science fantasy. 4. I am trying to broaden my reading horizons geographically by reading more books in translation

Posted on December 27, 2019, in American authors, Book Reviews and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. Thank you for all your interest. I would love to hear from you once you have read the novel.

    • I did read it John – the post you commented on was my review

      • I feel stupid in that I thought that I was communicating with the people who had commented. Obviously, I should know better since I have blogged for years on other subjects. Since I have your attention, I want to thank you for the review. If you care for any comment, I will be happy to oblige. My reviews have been excellent on both sides of the pond, but I have to tell you that I feel the novel is better received in the UK. Shh. Don’t tell anybody, but I think it has to do with the education systems. As an American, the reason for my living in Europe for most of my life has to do with just that.

  2. That sounds fascinating–and exhausting! Great review.

  3. It sure sounds like one of those books that one must read the first half without asking what’s going on and hope it all falls into place during the second half. Such an interesting concept for a novel. 🤠🐧

  4. This sounds interesting. It may be that the structure of the plot is based upon the strange behavior of particles on the quantum level. I have only the understanding of a curious layperson, but I find quantum physics to be fascinating.

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