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Library of Wales celebrates the country’s authors

It’s taken more than a decade but a government-backed initiative to celebrate the English-language literary heritage of Wales is on the cusp of a significant milestone.  Since the Library of Wales project got underway in 2006, 49 titles have been published, many of them books that had been forgotten or were out of print. The 50th is due to hit the bookshops in a few months.

The Library of Wales series is a selection of English-language classics from Wales, ranging from novels to short stories, biographies and poetry. It’s funded by the Welsh Assembly Government through the Welsh Books Council as a way of sustaining the country’s heritage. When the project was announced in 2006 the intention was to o “…include the best of Welsh writing in English, as well as to showcase what has been unjustly neglected. ” 

Have they succeeded?

Raymond Williams

Professor Raymond Williams

It would be hard to challenge the inclusion of Raymond Williams in the list of books selected by the series editor Professor Dai Smith.  Williams, who came from Monmouthshire, was one of the leading literary academics in the UK in the 1970s and 80s. His writings on politics, culture, the mass media and literature were influential in the developing field of Marxist criticism of literature. He has two titles in the Library of Wales series: his novel Border Country was actually the first book to be published in the  Library of Wales series. Published in the 1960s it had been out of print for several years. I was expecting The Country and The City,  in which he used alternating chapters on literature and social history to consider perceptions of rural and urban life, to be included. But instead we another novel, The Volunteers. Personally I would have opted for another of his academic works instead of the latter.

No surprises either to find the Rhondda author and broadcaster Gwyn Thomas included, also with three titles. I’ve read only one of these The Alone to the Alone and though I enjoyed it, I wonder if it’s too much a novel of its time and will not resonate as well in modern-day Wales.

Equally unsurprising to see the big guns Alun Lewis, Glyn Jones, Emyr Humphreys and Jack Jones amongst the selected authors.

A few choices did cause some raised eyebrows in the Booker household however.  Carwyn by Alun Richards is a biography of one of the big names from the golden era of Welsh Rugby. I can’t help wondering if this is on the list because of the popularity of the subject rather than because it’s the best biography written by a Welsh author. I’m also lukewarm about the choice of autobiographical novel, Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve by Dannie Abse. I would have expected his inclusion to be more for his poetry than his prose. 

The question of how decisions were made what to include came up in a discussion panel at the Hay Festival about the Library of Wales initiative. Unfortunately Dai Smith was ill so couldn’t attend to answer a challenge from an audience member so it was left to Phil George, Chairman of the Arts Council, to defend the selection. He didn’t convince the questioner that this wasn’t “The Dai Smith Library of Wales” rather than a generally acceptable selection of the best from Welsh writers.

But the Library of Wales is to continue. The series publishers, Parthian Books, will be issuing the 5oth title in September, with a new book from Stevie Davies who was shortlisted for the Booker Prize in 2001 with The Element of Water.  It’s likely to find favour with one of the other Hay panelists, lecturer Tomos Owen, who wants to see more contemporary authors selected.

Here are all the 50 books in the series. Click on the title to read the description and order the book direct from Parthian.

  1. A Kingdom, James Hanley
  2. A Rope of Vines, Brenda Chamberlain
  3. A Time to Laugh, Rhys Davies
  4. All Things Betray Thee, Gwyn Thomas
  5. The Alone to the Alone, Gwyn Thomas
  6. Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve, Dannie Abse
  7. The Battle to the Weak, Hilda Vaughan
  8. Black Parade, Jack Jones
  9. Border CountryRaymond Williams
  10. Carwyn, Alun Richards
  11. The Caves of AlienationStuart Evans
  12. Congratulate the Devil, Howell Davies
  13. Country Dance, Margiad Evans
  14. Cwmardy, Lewis Jones
  15. Dai Country, Alun Richards
  16. Dat’s Love and Other StoriesLeonora Brito
  17. The Dark Philosophers, Gwyn Thomas
  18. Farewell Innocence, William Glynne-Jones
  19. Flame and Slag, Ron Berry
  20. Goodbye, Twentieth Century, Dannie Abse
  21. The Great God Pan, Arthur Machen
  22. The Heyday in the BloodGeraint Goodwin
  23. The Hill of DreamsArthur Machen
  24. Home to an Empty House, Alun Richards
  25. I Sent a Letter to My Love, Bernice Rubens
  26. In the Green Tree, Alun Lewis
  27. Jampot Smith, Jeremy Brooks
  28. Make Room for the Jester, Stead Jones
  29. Old Soldier Sahib, Frank Richards
  30. Old Soldiers Never Die, Frank Richards
  31. Poetry 1900–2000, Meic Stephens (ed.)
  32. Rhapsody, Dorothy Edwards
  33. Ride the White Stallion, William Glynne-Jones
  34. So Long, Hector Bebb, Ron Berry
  35. Anthology of Sport, Gareth Williams (ed.)
  36. The Library of Wales Short Story Anthology Volume I, Dai Smith
  37. The Library of Wales Short Story Anthology Volume II, Dai Smith
  38. Turf or Stone, Margiad Evans
  39. The Valley, The City, The Village, Glyn Jones
  40. Voices of the Children, George Ewart Evans
  41. The Volunteers, Raymond Williams
  42. The Water-castle, Brenda Chamberlain
  43. We LiveLewis Jones
  44. The Withered Root, Rhys Davies
  45. A Man’s Estate, Emyr Humphreys
  46. The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp W. H. Davies
  47. Young Emma, W.H. Davies
  48. In and Out of the Goldfish Bowl by Rachel Tresize
  49. Selected Stories, Rhys Davies

 

An Update: July 3, 2018

After I published this post, Richard Davies, the mastermind at Parthian, graciously pointed out that I had miscounted. I thought there were already 50 books published and the 51st would come out in September. But I inadvertently added a Raymond Williams text that isn’t really part of the Library of Wales series. I’ve now corrected my post.

 

Booker Talk in books

Adam at Roof Beam Reader reminded me about a tag where you spell out the name of the blog site using the title of books on your TBR.  The idea started at Fictionophile and is now at On Bookes. 

The rules

  1. Spell out your blog’s name.
  2. Find a book from your TBR that begins with each letter. (Note you cannot ADD to your TBR to complete this challenge – the books must already be on your TBR.)
  3. Have fun!

I’m in need today of a diversion from gardening so here goes

Booker

booker in titles

B: Border Country by Raymond Williams:  The first book to be published in the  Library of Wales series. Published in the 1960s it had been out of print for several years.

O: Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf:  I enjoyed Benediction by the same author but haven’t got around to this one yet. Nor have I seen the film.

O: Old Soldiers Never Die by Frank Richards: Another in the Library of Wales series.

K: The Kill by Emile Zola: Part of the 20-cycle Rougon Maquet series

E: Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton: Bought on a business trip to Michigan when I was trying to unwind in the bookshop after a very long day.

R: Return of the Soldier by Rebecca West: Wish I could remember when I bought this and was prompted me to do so

Talk

talk in titles

T: Tigers in Red Weather by Lisa Klausmann: A bargain purchase in a very unusual location – a local branch of Poundstretchers.

A: Armadale by Wilkie Collins: I went through a phase of reading Collins back in the 1980s but never got to this. It’s moved house three times…..

L: Long Song by Andrea Levy: I think I bought this when the local library had the first – and the best – of their sales. Since then the pickings have been very slim indeed.

K: King Rat by James Clavell : I tried reading Shogun but gave up after about 50 pages. My husband assures me this is a million time better.

Have I learned anything from this little exercise?  Not really other than I appear to have a dirth of books whose titles begin with the letter K. Fortunately my blog name didn’t have a third K otherwise I’d have been at a loss (an excuse to go buying maybe??). But of B’s and L’s I have an embarrassment of riches.

 

 

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