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Do awards matter to authors?

Cwtch Corner: where authors from Wales get to talk about their work, what inspires their writing and their favourite authors and books.

Cwtch-Corner

Cwtch Corner went transatlantic this month. I’d dearly have loved to visit Canada to talk in person with Cathy Ace but the tortuous journey home from New Zealand has made me less than enthusiastic for long haul flights. Maybe I’ll get a chance to meet her when she makes one of her frequent trips home to Wales to visit family or attend a crime fiction festival. 

Cathy moved to Canada to teach at the University of British Columbia. It was a long way to go to meet and marry a ‘boy’ from her home town of Swansea! She lives in rural British Columbia where she gardens and writes. She has two series published: the Cait Morgan series features a Welsh-Canadian criminologist who specialises in profiling victims and the WISE Enquiries Agency series based on four women with a nose for mysteries. Her newest novel The Wrong Boy is a psychological suspense novel set on the Gower peninsular. 

 

Q. Hi Cathy, The Wrong Boy was published in January this year. Can you describe it for us in just one sentence?

Thanks for having me along to your lovely Cwtch Corner today. I adore the word cwtch and everything it means – I even used it in the book, where there’s a place called The Rhosddraig Cwtch (a small café/restaurant in the village of Rhosddraig, where the book is set – which is really Rhossili, but I disguised it to protect the innocent). But, I digress (not unusual for me) so, back to your question.

Oh my goodness me, describe this book in one sentence? Any limit to the length of that sentence, or the amount of punctuation I can use within it to allow it to be just one sentence? No? Hmm, well, maybe I’m not up to it…so I’ll let multi-award-winning author Elly Griffiths do it for me:

“A wonderfully dark, atmospheric tale about the way that evil reverberates through generations.”

Q. You’ve written two successful series – do you tend to plan a series as a whole or does each book just flow from the last one?

In the case of the Cait Morgan Mysteries I was given the opportunity to propose nine books to the publisher when I submitted the very first manuscript. Eight of those books were published with that publisher, so I was delighted to be able to follow the majority of the arc I’d planned for the two main characters – Cait Morgan and Bud Anderson – as well as “visit” the countries where I’d wanted Cait to discover each book’s titular corpse (eg: The Corpse with the Silver Tongue). Each was a country where I’d lived or worked for a period of time, and I very much wanted readers to get the chance to see a little of what I loved about each place. As for the ninth novel? That’s still in the pipeline.

For the WISE Enquiries Agency Mysteries I proposed two books to that publisher (a different one) at first, then another two, though in my mind I’d already planned five or six.

In both series the books follow a natural timeline in the lives of the main, recurring characters – though each novel truly stands alone, without any cliffhangers preventing readers from achieving full closure. That being said, I really think it helps to understand character development if a series of books is read in order – unless the characters experience very little true personal development (as in the case of Marple or Poirot, for example). As a reader I do dip into series, but usually find I want to go back to the beginning to find out where the characters ‘began’.”

Q.You’ve won several awards for your work (most recently an Independent Publishers Book Award for The Wrong Boy). How important are awards to authors? Do they tend to translate into sales? 

To be clear, I should say that I know different authors view different awards in different ways, so I can only speak for myself in this response.

To be shortlisted for an award, or to win one, provides an enormous boost to my confidence; I adore it when I meet, or hear from, readers who tell me how much they enjoy my work – but I still struggle with how to react…without gushing, or blushing, or stammering.

Being nominated or shortlisted for, or winning, an award is a time of pure joy – so the first thing I do is celebrate! There are so few moments when I’m not worrying about the book I’m trying to get folks to consider reading, or the one I’m plotting/outlining/writing, that it’s worth revelling in just one evening of indulgence…so I pop a cork, and sip with satisfaction – then the next day I get back to work.

In terms of sales? The effect can be immediate – there’s usually a bump in sales – but it has to be something you work at to make it a sustained advantage. What I will add is that I’ve found that being shortlisted for an award but not winning it (that’s happened to me three times, for different awards) can have exactly the same effect upon my psyche and my sales – so the effort to get out the news about about being shortlisted is equal to the effort I put into news about winning.”

Q. Though Welsh born, you’ve lived for many years across the other side of the Atlantic. How has that distance from home affected how you write about your native country

I didn’t migrate to Canada until I was forty so I will always be truly Welsh, though I’m now also “becoming” Canadian (except for the accent!). My husband is also Welsh, and both my mother and sister – as well as my husband’s family – all still live in and around Swansea…so I still feel close to home (I talk to Mum for about an hour on the phone every day!).

That said, I now have the distance between me and the day-to-day realities of life in Wales to allow me to stand back and see my Homeland slightly differently than I did when I lived there.

I didn’t begin to write fiction until I moved to Canada, so I don’t know how I might have written about Wales before I left…but I think it’s important in all scene-setting in fiction to paint just enough of a picture to allow the reader to fill in the gaps – like a Pointillist or Impressionist painting, rather than a photograph. I think the distance helps me do that, because I can better focus on aspects of Wales and Welshness that are critical to the reader’s understanding, instead of trying to pile on the details that might confuse rather than illuminate. At least, that’s what I hope I manage to do.”

Q. Who do you think is the most interesting sleuth in crime fiction?

“Oh gosh, that’s a difficult question to answer because there are some truly engaging sleuths – of all types – around.

Millhone (Sue Grafton), Warshawski (Sara Paretsky) and Spenser (Robert B. Parker) all have rich personal lives without being out-and-out weird professional investigators; Poirot, Marple (Agatha Christie) and Holmes (Conan Doyle) are unchanging, yet interesting despite that; Rebus (Ian Rankin), Reacher (Lee Child) and Rumpole (John Mortimer) pursue justice in totally different ways, face life-changing situations, yet still come up trumps; Galloway (Elly Griffiths), Bryant and May (Christopher Fowler) and Stanhope (Ann Cleeves) are some of my favourites too, yet all are completely different. And I could go on. And on. See? It’s an impossible question to answer…sorry.

Q. Your home is on fire… Which book will you choose to save?

Fire? My nightmare! We live half way up a little mountain in a rural area, where the nearest fire station is run by volunteers – so, around here (in the middle of a rain forest) most domestic fires lead to the complete loss of a home because none of us even have mains water – we all have wells. So you get out (hopefully) then have to watch everything burn, praying the fire doesn’t jump to the trees and become a major disaster, as you wait. Dreadful! *shivers*

But…OK, I’ll imagine a fire, just for you. Of course my beloved dog and husband get rescued first (wrong order?), then our photo albums (yes, we still have such things – and I must find the time to scan and save all those photos at some point). Then a book.

I look at it this way – a book is something that can be purchased again, whether as a new book or as a previously-loved copy of something that’s out of print. Books mean most when they’ve been given by someone, or are signed by someone who’s no longer around.

With that in mind, the one book I would save would have to be my copy of A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens; it’s a copy that was given to my mother for Christmas in 1944 by her aunt. I cannot imagine how expensive it must have been to purchase, or how wonderful to receive – an illustrated hardcover book, printed and published in 1944 with all the war shortages at their height…what a treat! Mum and Dad gave it to me for Christmas in 1969, and Dad and I would sit and read it together. I am deeply attached to the illustrations (by Emil Weiss) which stoke my nostalgia almost more than the words. My father loved A Christmas Carol – the story, the lessons, the book, and every version of it on film (he most enjoyed the one with Alistair Sim as Scrooge). For me, it’s an irreplaceable book, and therefore worth saving.”


If you’d like to learn more about Cathy or discover how to buy her books, take a look at her website  

She’s also on social media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ace-Author-318388861616661/

Twitter: @AceCathy

 

 

2019: What lies ahead

binoculars

Photo by Chase Clark on Unsplash

Now I’ve managed to close the lid on 2018 (see my wrap up post here), its time to turn my attention to 2019.

I’ve been wrestling with the question of whether to join some of the many challenges that are available. But on balance I decided that last year’s experiment with “Reading Naked” (by which I mean picking my next book randomly) was liberating so I plan to continue using that approach this year.

That doesn’t mean my year will be entirely without structure. But I’ll focus on projects rather than challenges. Challenges usually involve meeting a specific goal – reading a targeted number of books for example, or specified categories of books by a set date. I prefer the more open-ended nature of a project that I create for myself, where I get to decide on the scope and parameters.  I want the flexibility to go wherever my mood takes me.

Here’s how the year ahead could pan out.

I’m going for simplicity;  largely avoiding specific goals in favour of general directions. Most of these are continuations of existing projects and activities but – just to ring the changes – I’m going to start two new activities.

General directions 

  • Finish the Booker Prize project. This is the only specific goal I’m adopting this year. It should be a piece of cake since I have just two books and then I’m done. Although I have copies of the 2016 and 2018 books I’m not going to count them. If I manage to read them this year, they’ll be considered as bonus.
  • Re-connect with the Classics Club project.  I’m now 12 books away from the target of 50.  But I keep finding new titles to add so this could be a movable feast.
  • Travel the world: I stalled last year in my plan to read authors from a broader range of countries.  In a year when the UK is supposed to say goodbye to the EU, it feels appropriate to make sure my reading tastes have an international dimension.
  • Move through years of my life: I have a feeling that by reading more from my Classics Club list, I will be able to make progress on the Years of My Life project without having to make a special effort.

New Initiatives 

Booker Talk Team Expands

Booker Talk is approaching its 7th anniversary. I’m marking this milestone by expanding the team.  Two new faces will be making an appearance on this site shortly, contributing reviews and articles on reading, authors and books.

cerian fishlockCerian Fishlock is currently studying for an MA in Publishing. She’s an Agatha Christie fan who’s desperate to find a modern author that can match the Queen of Crime . She loves novels with a psychological edge and “if that can be combined with defeating the patriarchy, even better.”

 

 

 

edward colleyEdward Colley is a retired newspaper editor and graphic designer with an eclectic taste in books. He counts Thomas Hardy among his favourite authors.  In between reading fiction he enjoys biographies and travel writing .

 

 

 

 

Connecting with Welsh authors/publishers

For the past year I’ve been trying to support and promote literature from my home country of Wales, through reviews and the odd feature article on this site. Now I’m going a step further by creating a new series where we get to know some of the authors based in Wales.

cwtch definition I’m calling this new series Cwtch Corner. The idea is to get into a conversation with an author about their favourite authors and books, how and where they get their inspiration and what readers can expect from their own novel/s. This is a spot where authors could pitch their work to potential readers.

Never seen that word Cwtch before?  It’s a word used in the Welsh language to describe a physical place –  a small cubbyhole for example or a small room in a pub. But it also denotes a form of affection, love and caring. Think of it like a cuddle or a hug. So authors taking part in Cwtch Corner are hopefully going to find the experience a bit like being wrapped in a warm embrace.

I’m reaching out to authors to participate at the moment but if you know someone you think might be interested just ask them to contact me via Twitter using @bookertalk. Please note however that I am not intending to feature self-published authors.

 

 

Guide To Literature from Wales

Vale of Glamorgan Heritage Coast, Wales

Your challenge today is to name an author from Wales.

Dylan Thomas, you say? 

Well done. He’s probably Wales’ most famous writer. So maybe not surprising you thought of him first. 

But is that it? No other Welsh author comes to mind?

How about Sarah Waters? Or Cynan Jones? Or Owen Sheers?

It might surprise you to find that these authors are part of the rich literary tradition of Wales. 

If you’ve ever wanted to know more about authors from Wales, this page is a good place to begin. It’s a signpost to content on this blog that relates to fiction from Wales.

Want to discover a Welsh author? 

If you’re looking for ideas or inspiration, I’ve written two posts that will get you off to a good start. .

What are the BEST novels from Wales?

It’s almost impossible to name just one or two or even 20. So I’ve put a list together of 88 books that I think give you a good representation of authors and genres. Check out the list on the “88 books from Wales” page.

One of the big questions that comes up frequently is whether there is such a thing as ” The Great Welsh Novel?” Over the years, various experts have tried to find an answer to that. You can read some of their opinions here

In the article A Secret Literary Giant from Wales you can also discover an author whose name sadly isn’t as well know as it deserves to be.

Get To Know The Authors

Cwtch-Corner

For the last year or so I’ve been interviewing authors who live and work in Wales. I’ve called the feature,  Cwtch Corner because the word Cwtch is one used in Wales to mean a cuddle or a cosy corner. Click the link to find all the interviews.

About Booker Talk

Love Talking About Books? Great. You’re In The Right Place

That’s exactly what you get at BookerTalk. Conversations about books.

It’s a melting pot of reviews, discussions and interviews. A space where as avid readers we can indulge in our favourite topic.

Who Is Booker Talk?

I’m Karen. A life-long book addict from Wales.

I love reading books.

I love talking about books. To anyone and everyone.

My friends and relatives were exhausted by my constant chatter about the books I’d just bought, the ones I planned to buy; the books I’d just read and the ones I wanted to read.

In desperation I turned to strangers. Passengers on planes and trains; patients in hospital waiting rooms, customers in cafes. If I saw them reading a book I just couldn’t resist the opportunity for a chat.

I created BookerTalk eight years ago as a space where book addicts like myself could get together and chat about the thing we love most. My original intention was just to blog about my Booker Prize project. But as my interests grew, so did the focus of the blog.

What can you expect from BookerTalk?

Now at BookerTalk you’ll find my reviews of books from 19th century fiction to contemporary literature; from historical fiction to fiction in translation. There may even be a crime novel now and again.

One thing I promise you: This is a blog site completely free of books whose cover features bare chested guys or smouldering women with long lashes and pouty lips. That might be he last book in the shop but no way am I buying!

You’ll also find book recommendations. Perfect for people like you who need to fill gaps in those bookshelves.

And there’s a special corner I reserve just for sharing my passion for the literature of my home country of Wales. I call it Cwtch Corner because in Wales we do love to cwtch (cuddle up) with our friends. So you’ll find interviews with Welsh authors and features on Welsh literature.

Let’s Get Talking

I love hearing from other readers so please do leave comments on anything you see on the blog.

If you want to get in touch with me, please see my Get In Touch page

  • send me a private message via Twitter @bookertalk.
  • use the contact form below uk

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