BookerTalk

Classics Club Spin Revolves Again

The Classics Club Spin is beginning again and I almost missed it but am hoping that, since the team that runs this is five hours ahead of me, I can just squeak in at the last minute. It’s a good way of pushing me to make progress on my list without having the pressure of a challenge. Last time around I ended up with Henry James and Washington Square/Daisy Miller which I wasn’t looking forward to but appreciated in the end. Here’s keeping my fingers crossed I get something good this time around.

The rules for Spin Number 9 are the same as before:

I’m going to mix things up a little by adding my own rule: My 20 books have to be from my TBR pile (i.e., I already have them in my possession). That way I get to clear some space in my bookshelf … or floorspace.

So here is my list. Many of them are re-reads – books I read when I was much much younger and feel I didn’t fully appreciate or understand at the time. These are marked **

  1. Vicar of Wakefield – Oliver Goldsmith 1766
  2. Mansfield Park  – Jane Austen 1814**
  3. Old Goriot – Honore Balzac 1835
  4. Can You Forgive Her – Anthony Trollope 1864**
  5. The Way we Live Now – Anthony Trollope 1875
  6. Dr Thorne – Anthony Trollope 1858
  7. Adam Bede – George Eliot 1859**
  8. The Fortune of the Rougons – Emile Zola 1871
  9. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy 1873-77
  10. Daniel Deronda – George Eliot 1876 **
  11. A Parisian Affair and other stories – Maupassant 1880
  12. The Diary of a Nobody – George Grossmith 1888
  13. The Voyage Out – Virginia Woolf 1915
  14. Age of Innocence – Edith Wharton 1920
  15. Mrs Dalloway – Virginia Woolf 1925 **
  16. Frost in May – Antonia White 1933
  17. The Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck 1939
  18. The Pursuit Of Love – Nancy Mitford 1945
  19. Cry, the Beloved Country – Alan Paton 1948
  20. Love in the Time of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez 1985

Which one do you think I would enjoy the most?

The symbol ** means I have read them previously

Update: I fixed my terrible spelling of the Balzac title thanks to an eagle eyed reader

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