Strong Poison by Dorothy L Sayers

strongpoisonStrong Poison is the fifth book to feature Dorothy L Sayers’ aristocratic private sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey. It doesn’t matter if you haven’t read any of the earlier novels for this book can stand on its own. It’s  a wonderful introduction to Wimsey and his methods which seem to involve a lot of thinking and casual conversations with witnesses and potential perpetrators. He has one ace up his sleeve –  the group of women known as ‘The Cattery’, members of  a fictitious typing bureau who are deployed to infiltrate houses and offices and nose about on his behalf.

These were spinsters with small fixed incomes or o comes at all, widows without family; women deserted by peripatetic husbands and living on a restricted alimony, who previous to their engagement ….had had no resources but bridge and boarding house gossip.

 

It’s a brilliant device because it gives scope for some wonderful characterisations and amusing episodes. In Strong Poison we benefit from  two highly amusing scenes in which one woman takes part in a seance and pretends to be a medium  and another where a man takes lessons from a master thief on how to pick locks.

The plot revolves Harriet Vane who is on trial for the murder by arsenic powder of her former lover. Whimsy attends the trial and is convinced that Harriet Vane is not guilty of murder but can he prove this in time to save her from the gallows? He’s up against it since the police are equally convinced they have the right culprit and even the judge at her trial seems to be against her. Finding the real poisoner isn’t just a case of exerting true justice – Wimsey has another motivation for solving the mystery – he has decided he wants to marry Harriet even though all he knows about her is what was revealed at the trial. She understandably demures at this proposal since she knows even less about him, but Wimsey is not a man to take no for an answer.

The plot is reasonably straight forward – surprisingly I guessed who the culprit was long before the revelation (as I suspect many other readers will). Less evident than the answer to the question whodunnit? was the answer to the question of how the murder was accomplished. That one kept me perplexed right to the end.

The plot is less important than the characters and the setting however. This is novel dating from the 1930s, an era often labelled as the “golden age of crime”  because it also saw the rise of two authors who became synonymous with crime fiction: Agatha Christie and Ngaio Marsh.  It’s an era wonderfully evoked by Sayers who of course was writing about her contemporary world. Equally masterful is her creation of Lord Wimsey. One moment you’re thinking that despite his elegant clothes and foppish language  he is a bit of an idiot and the next thinking how astute a judge of character he is.  A most unusual private eye .

All together an entertaining novel that did the job perfectly when I needed an antidote so some of my darker reading materials. I know where to turn when I’m next in that mood.

Footnotes

The Book: Strong Poison  by Dorothy  L. Sayers was published in 1930. According to Wikipedia the relationship between  Harriet and her lover  was inspired by Sayers’ own fraught relationship with fellow-author John Cournos. Cournos wanted her to ignore social mores and live with him without marriage, but she wanted to marry and have children. After a year of agony between 1921 and 1922, she learned that Cournos had claimed to be against marriage only to test her devotion, and she broke off with him.

My edition: Published by Hodder and Stoughton’s New English Library. It has an introduction by Elizabeth George which pays tribute to Sayers’ ability to conjure up compelling characters.

Why I read this: it was in a second hand book shop and in excellent condition so of course I had to buy it but then left it lingering on the shelf for a while.  I had just read Little Women and after so much saccharine I needed a complete change of pace .

 

About BookerTalk

What do you need to know about me? 1. I'm from Wales which is one of the countries in the UK and must never be confused with England. 2. My life has always revolved around the written and spoken word. I worked as a journalist for nine years then in international corporate communications 3. My tastes in books are eclectic. I love realism and hate science fiction and science fantasy. 4. I am trying to broaden my reading horizons geographically by reading more books in translation

Posted on November 28, 2016, in Book Reviews, Crime fiction, United Kingdom and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. This is a great Sayers novel. I must read more of her. There are so many I haven’t read. I love Harriet Vane and Peter Wimsey is a character I have learned to appreciate more as I get older.

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  2. Sayers is one of my favourites – I just love the Wimsey stories, and I think they’d definitely be on my desert island list!

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  3. I’ve not read this one, but am a fan of Sayers, and enjoy spending a few days in the company of Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane every now and then!

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  4. I’ve been meaning to read this for ages, so your post is a timely reminder to bump it up the pile. I’m glad to hear that it works as a standalone story – that’s always a bonus.

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  5. Another author I have vowed to read in the upcoming year. Thanks for sharing!

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  6. Strong Poison was the first Sayers I read, so it has a special place in my heart! I think for me it worked well as an introduction to her series because I liked Harriet so much. I don’t much care for the version of Peter here, but as Sayers said, he grows into someone who deserves her.

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